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Companion Planting isn't just for Fools!

By Angie, Apr 1 2013 09:00AM

Happy April!


I have been continuing with the planning while the weather is still pretty poor.


So, I have been busy sowing lots of flowers as one area that I have ensured isn't neglected is that of introducing flowers onto my plots to encourage pollinators, produce cut flowers and improve the look of the plot.


Some older plotholders tut at the sight of flowers on allotment plots, but I am a huge believer in the benefits of adding some flowers onto the plot. They lift the spirits on a drab day, provide food for the pollinators, allow me to indulge my love of flowers and encourage conversation with other plotholders.


Whilst I don't pretend to be an expert in companion planting, I have found a real benefit to introducing some plants on the plot purely for their companion qualities, seeing the numbers of ladybirds and their larvae on the plot as soon as the spring sunshine arrives, is testament to .


- Nasturtium

- Calendula

- French Marigolds

- Nigella

- Borage

- Limanthes (poached egg plants)

- Sweet Peas


I also grow other flowers in a cut flower border which encourages pollinators:


- Poppies

- Daffodils

- Tulips

- Irises

- Freesias

- Lillies

- Shasta Daisies

- Gladioli

- Alliums

- Lobelia Bonariensis

- Cornflowers

- Purple Cerinthe

- Sunflowers

- Scabious

- Echinacea

- Dahlias

- Chrysanthemums

- Eryngium

- Lupins


I also like to leave some herbs to go to flower - both to collect seed, but also to provide further nectar for the pollinators.


Here is a poppy growing in the border last summer:


Do you have any other companion plants you recommend?

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